Visit Botanical Gardens and Get Involved

Sunday, July 13, 2014 - 9:30am

In her wise and elegant new book, “Seeds of Hope: Wisdom and Wonder from the World of Plants,” Dr. Jane Goodall with Gail Hudson, blends her experience in nature with her enthusiasm for botany to give readers a deeper understanding of the world around us. Continuing their exploration here, Dr. Goodall provides ideas and inspiration for what readers can do to get involved in and protect the world of plants.

 
Botanical gardens provide a refuge of beauty and tranquility from the hectic schedule of daily life, as well as an opportunity to see exotic plants from all over the world. They also play an important role in education, plant conservation, and research. Many gardens host events with music, visual arts, food, and cultural activities.
 
 
 
The following are some famous botanical gardens that are open to the public:
  • Kew Gardens, London
  • Chelsea Physic Garden, London
  • Missouri Botanical Garden
  • Brooklyn Botanic Gardens
  • University of Puerto Rico Botanical Garden (also known as The San Juan Botanical Garden)
  • Singapore Botanic Gardens
  • Kadoorie Farm and Botanic Garden, Hong Kong
  • Munich Botanical Garden
  • National Botanic Garden of South Africa (also known as Kirstenbosch Botanic Gardens)
  • United States Botanic Garden, Washington, D.C.
Many arboretums and botanical gardens offer education programs for adults and youth about a variety of topics, such as horticulture and sustainable gardening, woodland stewardship, and nature photography. Some even offer certificate programs that could help you advance your career or transition into a new one.
 
Volunteer opportunities abound at botanical gardens. You can expand your knowledge of plants and meet others who share your love of gardening, all while contributing to conservation efforts. The possibilities vary depending on the organization; however, volunteers are often needed to plant annuals, monitor butterflies, provide guided tours, track rare plants, and lead educational programs in schools. Contact your local botanical garden to put your skills to use. 
 

To learn more about Dr. Goodall’s new book, please visit the “Seeds of Hope” page at www.janegoodall.org/seedsofhope. Have you missed some of our earlier blog posts? Don’t worry, see all of them below!

 

 
""

Add comment

The content of this field is kept private and will not be shown publicly.
CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

""
 

JGI News and Highlights

Featured Video

Walk in the footsteps of Jane Goodall with Google Maps

Featured Video

Featured Video

Saving Chimps From Snares (Graphic Images)!

This is the story of Mugu Moja, a young juvenile chimpanzee.