Where in the World is Dr. Jane?

Dr. Goodall: Today is a Day for Elephants

World Elephant Day, August 12, is one when animal lovers around the world join together to celebrate the miracle that is the Elephant.  It is a day to contemplate how truly wonderful they are, with their complex social lives, the close affectionate and  supportive bonds between family members that can last through life. There is a long childhood when calves learn from their mothers and the wise elders. They are curious and playful.

Jane Reflects on the 70th Anniversary of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki Bombings

Photo Credit: the Jane Goodall Institute / Bill Wallauer

Jane Speaks Out About Slain Lion


Image source: examiner.com

 

Dr. Goodall's Statement on Abandoned New York Blood Center Chimps

On Tuesday, July 21, hominoid specialist and Change.org petition starter, Dr. Brian Hare will deliver 185,000 petition signatures to the New York Blood Center (NYBC) headquarters in New York City. Dr. Hare, along with the Jane Goodall Institute, the Humane Society of the United States and nearly 30 other partners are urging the Center to reinstate funding for the lifetime care of 66 chimpanzees in Liberia previously used for medical research, abandoned by the NYBC in March.

55 Years at Gombe: Q and A With Jane on Growth of Life's Work

In 1960, anthropologist Louis Leakey sent Jane Goodall, a 26 year old native of England with no college degree or scientific experience, to Africa with a mission: learn everything she could about wild chimpanzees. Leakey hoped that information on chimpanzees would shed light on human’s evolutionary past. But for Goodall, studying the chimpanzees just to learn more about them was reward enough.

55 Years at Gombe: Q and A With Jane on Origins of Life Work

In 1960, anthropologist Louis Leakey sent Jane Goodall, a 26 year old native of England with no college degree or scientific experience, to Africa with a mission: learn everything she could about wild chimpanzees. Leakey hoped that information on chimpanzees would shed light on human’s evolutionary past. But for Goodall, studying the chimpanzees just to learn more about them was reward enough.

Jane Honored as Conservationist of the Year

On Sunday, June 7th at a private event in Stockholm, The Perfect World Foundation honored Jane with the “The Fragile Rhino” prize along with naming her conservationist of the year for 2015. The founders of The Perfect World Foundation, Ragnhild and Lars Jacobsson presented the award to Jane, who received it with representatives from the Jane Goodall Institute Sweden.

Jane in the News

Jane’s life has greatly changed since her days at Gombe studying chimpanzees. Instead of spending time below the forest canopy with the chimps, she now spends much of her time in lecture venues, hotels, and airports, hopping around from one destination to another to spread her message of hope and inspire millions to make the world a better place. At 81, Jane is a road warrior, traveling nearly 300 days worldwide each year since 1986, with a mission to educate people that we must act NOW if we want to save the planet and animals we love so much.

Final Chimpanzee Ruling for Endangered Species Act: Q and A with Jane

An important chimpanzee conservation milestone occurred in 1990 when U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) declared under the Endangered Species Act that wild chimpanzees' status would be classified as "endangered" rather than the previous "threatened." Unfortunately for captive chimpanzees, they remained classified as only threatened. On June 12, 2015, USFWS announced a change in this policy — now all chimpanzees, wild and captive, will be classified as endangered. Dr.
Syndicate content
 

JGI News and Highlights

Featured Video

Walk in the footsteps of Jane Goodall with Google Maps

Featured Video

Featured Video

Saving Chimps From Snares (Graphic Images)!

This is the story of Mugu Moja, a young juvenile chimpanzee.