JGI-USA

Spring 2013 Tour

To celebrate the kickoff of Dr. Jane's Spring 2013 USA lecture tour, here are some photos collected from the road! 

 

Dr. Jane gave a lecture at Ohio State University for an audience of more than 1,700 on March 25th. 

 

Happy Birthday Jane!


 

Today, April 3, is Dr. Goodall's 79th birthday. Every day, we are grateful for all Dr. Goodall does, traveling 300 days a year to spread her message of hope while encouraging all of us to make the world a better place for people, animals and the environment.

Motambo the Miracle: An Update

Motambo is adjusting nicely to his new life at Tchimpounga.  He has fully recovered from his tetanus infection, and his significant wounds have healed.  A few small marks on his skin are the only reminders of the terrible trauma he suffered at the hands of poachers.

Motambo with Makassi  and La Vieille

Tchindzoulou – Constructing an Island Sanctuary - Part 1 of 2

This post is the first of a two-part story about the development of three islands in the Kouilou River as part of the expansion of JGI's Tchimpounga Chimpanzee Rehabilitation Center in the Republic of Congo.

A New Arrival at Tchimpounga

At the end of April, Tchimpounga staff members welcomed a new arrival:  a baby girl named Anzac.  She was named Anzac because she came to the sanctuary on ANZAC Day (April 25, 2012)*, and because, like many war veterans, she had lost an arm.

When she arrived, Anzac was so small that the vet team had to weigh her using a food scale.  She weighed a mere 2.7 kilograms, making her one of the smallest chimps to arrive at the sanctuary.

Anzac being weighed

Jane's first big discovery: chimps eat meat

At 7:40 a.m. on October 30, sitting on her Peak, Jane heard a wild commotion in the treetops below her. She heard some "angry little screams," and finally saw 1 of 3 chimpanzees grasping something pink. Two bushpigs ran around the base of the tree, and chased a smaller chimpanzee up it. Baboons tried to get close, snarling and skirmishing with the chimps. Eventually the chimp with the coveted goods moved out onto a high, bare branch and Jane could see he was holding a piece of carcass.

'Big Man' fossil looks more human than chimp

A fossil discovery described in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences is inconsistent with common notions that our direct evolutionary ancestors looked more like chimpanzees or gorillas than humans.

Like the famous "Lucy," this fossil, dubbed "Big Man," is Australopithecus afarensis, a bipedal primate and direct ancestor of humans. Big Man stood about 5'5," had legs that would have been good for running, and had a rib cage similar to our own. He was much taller than Lucy.

Jane on 'The Peak' and chimps in the trees

After a few weeks at Gombe, Jane found a perfect vantage point for watching the chimpanzees. It was a high ridge that gave her a good view in all directions. She could see the chimpanzees moving in the trees, and she could hear if they called.

"Retired" entertainment chimps: a very real problem

If you're a frequent visitor to our website or belong to our online community*, you may have heard us explain that entertainment chimpanzees generally can't be retired to zoos, because they haven't learned chimpanzee social skills and therefore don't fit in easily with established chimpanzee groups.

Syndicate content
 

JGI News and Highlights

Featured Video

Walk in the footsteps of Jane Goodall with Google Maps

Featured Video

Featured Video

Saving Chimps From Snares (Graphic Images)!

This is the story of Mugu Moja, a young juvenile chimpanzee.