JGI Chimpanzee Blog

News and anecdotes about chimpanzees

What was Known?

What was known about chimpanzees when Jane Goodall stepped off that boat to begin her study of the wild chimp communities living in Tanzanian forest around one of the world's longest, largest and deepest freshwater lakes, (Lake Tanganyika)?

NGeo Video: Self-Recognition in Apes

You may have read about the "mark test" or "mirror test." It's a way scientists study self-awareness or self-recognition. They surreptitiously put a colored dot or other mark on a subject -- often somewhere on the face. If, while looking in a mirror, subjects touch their marks or adjust their position to see them better, it's clear they understand they're looking at an image of themselves, rather than at other beings. Species that have passed the mark test include all great apes, bottlenose dolphins and magpies.

In Fort Pierce, bringing the doctor to the chimps

Save the Chimps, a sanctuary in Ft. Pierce, Florida for former laboratory and entertainment chimpanzees (including the "astrochimps" the Air Force used in research), found a creative solution to the problems created by transporting chimpanzees for medical care: a mobile vet lab.

A Look Back at Jane's Amazing Story

On July 14, 2010, it will be 50 years to the day that Jane Goodall first stepped out of a game warden’s boat onto the pebbly beach at the Gombe Chimpanzee Reserve in what is today Tanzania. At the time, she expected to be in the forest observing wild chimpanzees for 3 or 4 months.

Climate Change Figured in Ancient Apes' Disappearance

A new study reports that great apes were wiped out in ancient Europe when climate and environmental changes replaced forests with grasslands. The change meant monkeys thrived but great apes did not. "Ancient relatives of modern orangutans, gorillas, chimpanzees and gibbons were able to survive in Asia and Africa, where those changes were not as drastic," reports the BBC.

Chimp Video: Mother and Child Reunion

If you missed National Geographic's documentary in April about the Fongoli chimpanzees in Senegal, Chimps: Next of Kin, check out this remarkable video. It shows field researchers returning a stolen baby chimp to her mother and community.

"Scientists building Green Corridor to connect fading chimps colony to nearby mountains" -- USA Today

Japanese biologists have now begun to plant a corridor of trees across a savanna to try to connect one tiny isolated group of chimpanzees to a mountain range where thousands live.

"It's a prison sentence that they don't deserve"

KING 5 News in Washington state reports on the Great Ape Protection Act and visits chimps like Jamie, who likes to wear cowboy boots, at the Chimpanzee Sanctuary Northwest. Check out the footage and article.

 

Impact of observation studied

Here's an interesting Planet Earth article about a study monitoring the impact of tourists and scientists on western lowland gorillas. Findings suggest it may be worthwile to increase the distance humans are required to keep from the gorillas, to keep the stress levels low and avoid possible aggression. The researchers note that there are other factors influencing the gorillas' behavior and that further study is needed.

 

 

A Bonobo 'No'

It's a scenario you'll recognize. A Mom's firm "no," via shade of the head, to her toddler, who is getting into something he or she shouldn't.

Scientists studying great ape infant behavior witnessed 4 bonobos shaking their heads in ways that appeared to mean "no" on 13 different occasions. The observation raises the question: Is the "no" head shake hard-coded in humans?

BBC Earth  News has the video.

 

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JGI News and Highlights

Featured Video

Wounda's Journey

Watch her enjoy her new home at the Tchimpounga Chimpanzee Rehabilitation Center in the Republic of Congo.

Featured Video

Featured Video

Saving Chimps From Snares (Graphic Images)!

This is the story of Mugu Moja, a young juvenile chimpanzee.