JGI Chimpanzee Blog

News and anecdotes about chimpanzees

Life with Lemba

Each morning, Wounda receives a liter of milk. This is just one of several treatments she receives due to a recent illness. Young Lemba watches in anticipation until the caregivers produce a bottle for her. For Lemba, milk is a special treat, so the mornings are her favorite part of the day.

Life with Lemba

Friendly Zola

In late May, authorities confiscated an 18-month-old male named “Zola” in Imphondo, which is a town found in the north of Congo. Imphondo is located along the Ubangui River, which flows into the Congo.

Adorable Anzac

Little Anzac, a recent arrival at Tchimpounga, is one of the many victims of the illegal commercial bushmeat trade.  Congolese authorities confiscated her from a poacher before turning her over to the caregivers at the Jane Goodall Institute’s sanctuary.

In the mornings, Anzac loves to make grass angels, similar to the snow angels many human children make during the winter months.  She lies on her back, flapping her arms about and enjoying the feel of the dew-covered ground.

Tchimpounga Nursery Overflowing

Over the past six months, Tchimpounga has received six more orphaned infants.  As a result, each caregiver is taking care of three or more chimpanzees, which is overwhelming to say the least.

Lemba, a young chimpanzee whose legs are paralyzed from polio, acts as the adoptive mother.  Unlike the caregivers who have 24-hour responsibilities, Lemba’s duties only require that she play with the babies and keep an eye on them during the day. 

The Long Road to Chimpanzee Rehabilitation

As our 4WD trudges along the last stretch of road into the Jane Goodall Institute’s Tchimpounga Chimpanzee Rehabilitation Centre, one hour north of Pointe Noire in the Republic of Congo (Congo), it is the sound of hooting chimpanzees that first announces our arrival. The centre is situated on a hilltop, overlooking a patchwork of forest and swampy plains, just a few kilometres from the Atlantic Ocean. As with most visitors to the sanctuary, it took me a couple of weeks to begin to understand the complexity and dedication required to care for and rehabilitate chimpanzees.

A New Baby for Glitter

During Glitter’s first week with her new baby (born May 30, 2012), she was quite elusive, hiding with her newborn and avoiding encounters with other chimps, particularly her mother, Gremlin.  It normally takes time before a female chimpanzee fully introduces her baby into community life.  Glitter, however, was nervous and unwilling to trust other chimps, seemingly an effect of having lost her first baby to her mother.  Now that she is getting more comfortable with her mother and the other chimps, we have been enjoying the newest addition to the G-Family.  The baby

Amazing Crane Migration

Each year along the shores of the Platte River, near Kearney, Nebraska, a phenomenal natural event takes place—the spring migration of the whooping and sandhill cranes. Though the great migrations of the buffalo and passenger pigeon have become obsolete, there still exists, unknown to many, an opportunity to witness an equally spectacular occurrence in the crane migration.

Foraging Frodo

JGI’s Deus Mjungu reports on the Gombe chimpanzees’ latest adventures.

The chimpanzee diet includes a great deal of fruit. For the past two months, however, the fruit supply in the Kasekela chimpanzees' range has been far from plentiful. As a result, the chimpanzees are traveling in small groups or on their own to minimize competition for food.

A New Arrival at Tchimpounga

At the end of April, Tchimpounga staff members welcomed a new arrival:  a baby girl named Anzac.  She was named Anzac because she came to the sanctuary on ANZAC Day (April 25, 2012)*, and because, like many war veterans, she had lost an arm.

When she arrived, Anzac was so small that the vet team had to weigh her using a food scale.  She weighed a mere 2.7 kilograms, making her one of the smallest chimps to arrive at the sanctuary.

Anzac being weighed

Mischievous Lemba

Lemba likes to play with her caregivers' shoes. The caregivers at Tchimpounga are very patient and allow the small chimpanzee to nip, hit and hide their sandals.

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