Communications

Shawn Sweeney

Director, Community Engagement

Shawn Sweeney serves the Jane Goodall Institute as director of Community Engagement. In his role Shawn is reponsible for colaborating with JGI's field teams to bring the stories of their work to JGI's worldwide audiences. Through the Web, email, traditional and social media Shawn helps people connect with JGI's mission and understand what they can do to help chimpanzees, their habitats and the world we share. 

 

Bill Wallauer

Principal Photography

Bill Wallauer offers a unique and fascinating view of life among wild chimpanzees. For 15 years, Bill spent just about every day following the wild chimpanzees of Gombe National Park in Tanzania, capturing the intimate details of their daily life. He has commented that, during those years, he spent more time with chimpanzees than with humans.

Bill Wallauer

Principal Photography

Bill Wallauer offers a unique and fascinating view of life among wild chimpanzees. For 15 years, Bill spent just about every day following the wild chimpanzees of Gombe National Park in Tanzania, capturing the intimate details of their daily life. He has commented that, during those years, he spent more time with chimpanzees than with humans.

Celebrate International Day for Biological Diversity!

In honor of yesterday’s United Nations International Day for Biological Diversity, please join the Jane Goodall Institute (JGI) in celebrating our world’s natural beauty and diversity.

United for healthy skin and a healthy planet

Noli n Nali Collaborates with the Jane Goodall Institute,
Taking a Stand for Future Generations

SANTA CRUZ, Calif., September X, 2010 – This fall, Noli n Nali offers a line of earth-friendly, body-friendly skin care products that now carry the Jane Goodall Institute’s Good for All brand. This natural collaboration between the Institute and Noli n Nali is inspired by a common vision.

JGI Praises U.S. Congress for Approval of Wildlife Postage Stamp

The Jane Goodall Institute (JGI) applauds Wednesday’s passage of a bill to help supplement existing endangered species protection funds. The Multinational Species Conservation Funds Semipostal Stamp Act of 2010 (H.R. 1454) offers the public a convenient way to support the conservation of great apes, tigers, rhinos, elephants, and marine turtles through the purchase of a special postage stamp. Fifteen cents from the sale of each stamp will be directed to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to help support operations of the Multinational Species Conservation Funds (MSCF).

Jane's first big discovery: chimps eat meat

At 7:40 a.m. on October 30, sitting on her Peak, Jane heard a wild commotion in the treetops below her. She heard some "angry little screams," and finally saw 1 of 3 chimpanzees grasping something pink. Two bushpigs ran around the base of the tree, and chased a smaller chimpanzee up it. Baboons tried to get close, snarling and skirmishing with the chimps. Eventually the chimp with the coveted goods moved out onto a high, bare branch and Jane could see he was holding a piece of carcass.

'Big Man' fossil looks more human than chimp

A fossil discovery described in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences is inconsistent with common notions that our direct evolutionary ancestors looked more like chimpanzees or gorillas than humans.

Like the famous "Lucy," this fossil, dubbed "Big Man," is Australopithecus afarensis, a bipedal primate and direct ancestor of humans. Big Man stood about 5'5," had legs that would have been good for running, and had a rib cage similar to our own. He was much taller than Lucy.

Hey Kids: You Can Help Jane Goodall’s Roots & Shoots Win a $100,000 Grant From Disney’s Friends for Change: Project Green!

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Jane Goodall’s Roots & Shoots has big news to share! Its Native Americas Program on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota is in the running for a very special grant! And kids around the country decide who wins the $100,000 first prize.

Jane on 'The Peak' and chimps in the trees

After a few weeks at Gombe, Jane found a perfect vantage point for watching the chimpanzees. It was a high ridge that gave her a good view in all directions. She could see the chimpanzees moving in the trees, and she could hear if they called.

Syndicate content
 

JGI News and Highlights

Featured Video

Walk in the footsteps of Jane Goodall with Google Maps

Featured Video

Featured Video

Saving Chimps From Snares (Graphic Images)!

This is the story of Mugu Moja, a young juvenile chimpanzee.