chimpanzees

Jane on 'The Peak' and chimps in the trees

After a few weeks at Gombe, Jane found a perfect vantage point for watching the chimpanzees. It was a high ridge that gave her a good view in all directions. She could see the chimpanzees moving in the trees, and she could hear if they called.

"Retired" entertainment chimps: a very real problem

If you're a frequent visitor to our website or belong to our online community*, you may have heard us explain that entertainment chimpanzees generally can't be retired to zoos, because they haven't learned chimpanzee social skills and therefore don't fit in easily with established chimpanzee groups.

New study links chimp aggression to resource gain

A new study shows that male chimpanzee groups move into the territory of other chimpanzee groups to attack them and ultimately take over the territory or mates. But the scientists who conducted the study say they are reluctant to draw comparisons to human warfare. Instead, they are emphasizing the individual cooperation involved.

The Guardian quotes scientist John Mitani, a primate behavioral ecologist at the University of Michigan:

Gombe's biodiversity

What kind of animals would Jane have seen in her first weeks at Gombe? The forest to this day is home to an array of species. Baboons are seemingly ubiquitous, and red colobus monkeys are common as well.

Jane wrote a letter to her family describing some of the animals she encountered:

Thanks, Nat Geo!

National Geographic posted this video of a chimp baby in Tanzania doing what "kids" do best -- playing!

Hope you enjoy it as much as we did!

 

Armed with a notebook and binoculars

Jane had come to East Africa from England in 1957, to pursue a dream she'd had since she was a child: to study and write about animals in Africa. In Kenya, legendary anthropologist Louis Leakey hired her as his assistant. He was eager to organize field studies of all the great apes in the wild, for they could teach much about human evolution.

What was Known?

What was known about chimpanzees when Jane Goodall stepped off that boat to begin her study of the wild chimp communities living in Tanzanian forest around one of the world's longest, largest and deepest freshwater lakes, (Lake Tanganyika)?

A Look Back at Jane's Amazing Story

On July 14, 2010, it will be 50 years to the day that Jane Goodall first stepped out of a game warden’s boat onto the pebbly beach at the Gombe Chimpanzee Reserve in what is today Tanzania. At the time, she expected to be in the forest observing wild chimpanzees for 3 or 4 months.

Jane’s classic books re-released with new material!

Those of you who first came to know of Jane Goodall through her seminal books about the chimpanzees of Gombe, In the Shadow of Man and Through a Window, will be happy to know that the books have been re-released in new, updated editions
 
In the Shadow of Man, first released in 1971, is an overview of Jane’s world-renowned field study of chimpanzees in Tanzania, covering the years through 1970 and including the major discovery of tool use.

Chimp Video: Mother and Child Reunion

If you missed National Geographic's documentary in April about the Fongoli chimpanzees in Senegal, Chimps: Next of Kin, check out this remarkable video. It shows field researchers returning a stolen baby chimp to her mother and community.

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Walk in the footsteps of Jane Goodall with Google Maps

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Saving Chimps From Snares (Graphic Images)!

This is the story of Mugu Moja, a young juvenile chimpanzee.