conservation

55 Years at Gombe: Q and A With Jane on Origins of Life Work

In 1960, anthropologist Louis Leakey sent Jane Goodall, a 26 year old native of England with no college degree or scientific experience, to Africa with a mission: learn everything she could about wild chimpanzees. Leakey hoped that information on chimpanzees would shed light on human’s evolutionary past. But for Goodall, studying the chimpanzees just to learn more about them was reward enough.

5 Ways IUCN's New Great Apes Conservation Plan Aligns with JGI's Mission

A glossy white billboard soars above young children’s heads bearing larger-than-life images of a chimpanzee and a gorilla under the declaration Protect the Chimpanzees and Gorillas: The Congo’s Heritage for Future Generations. Connecting the images of the two apes, with their matching brilliant black coats of fur and proud gazes off into the distance, is a small flag of the Republic of Congo.

Tchimpounga Mandrills Successfully Released Back Into Wild

The Jane Goodall Institute’s Tchimpounga sanctuary is home to over 100 primates — but did you know that not all of those primates are chimpanzees?
 
Tchimpounga has undertaken the care and rehabilitation of a number of rescued mandrills. Mandrills are intelligent, social and one of the most colorful mammals in the world. Unfortunately, they are also endangered.
Mbote and her new infant, born in the wild. Photo Credit: Brad Mckenzie.

Final Chimpanzee Ruling for Endangered Species Act: Q and A with Jane

An important chimpanzee conservation milestone occurred in 1990 when U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) declared under the Endangered Species Act that wild chimpanzees' status would be classified as "endangered" rather than the previous "threatened." Unfortunately for captive chimpanzees, they remained classified as only threatened. On June 12, 2015, USFWS announced a change in this policy — now all chimpanzees, wild and captive, will be classified as endangered. Dr.

Crowdfunding Success - JGI Raises Funds for Herbal Medicine Project

This spring, JGI successfully completed its first crowdfunding campaign for Jane Goodall’s Roots & Shoots in Tanzania, raising over $16,000 via Pozible. The project aims to engage students from Sokoine Primary School in a study of local plants found in a nearby forest reserve. 
 
Having protected the forest reserve for a number of years now, the students are eager to spread information about the medicinal benefit of plants found in the forest.

Making a Difference: Jane Goodall's Roots & Shoots

Produced by National Geographic Television, this short video highlights Jane Goodall's Roots & Shoots, the global youth program of the Jane Goodall Institute which was founded by Dr. Jane Goodall and a group of Tanzanian students in 1991.

Jane Supports Disneynature as Ambassador

I am very proud to serve as a Disneynature Ambassador and to join Disney in speaking up about the importance of protected areas like America’s national parks to preserving the habitats and natural resources all of us need to thrive. 
 
I joined the Disneynature team while they were filming the movie Bears, I witnessed first-hand the beauty of America’s national parks.

Global Forest Watch: Dynamic New Platform to Protect Forests Worldwide

More than 40 partners launch near-real time forest monitoring system

WASHINGTON (February 20, 2014) — Today the World Resources Institute (WRI), Google, and a group of more than 40 partners launched Global Forest Watch (GFW), a dynamic online forest monitoring and alert system that empowers people everywhere to better manage forests.

Youth Council Launches New US National Parks Initiative

Initiative includes video contest for grants to support projects that protect wildlife and wild places.
 
This week, the National Youth Leadership Council (NYLC) of Jane Goodall’s Roots & Shoots, JGI’s global environmental and humanitarian youth program, launched a new US-based initiative seeking to protect the country’s network of national parks.

Live stream Event: Dr. Jane Goodall & Dr. Roger Payne in Patagonia, Argentina

Broadcasted live from the Hilton Hotel in Buenos Aires, watch the first time Dr. Jane Goodall meets Dr. Roger Payne, a man who changed our understanding of whales and how they communicate with each other. Goodall and Payne have a lot in common: Both are responsible for more than 50 years of animal behavior research, have appeared in National Geographic, founded a non-profit organization to support their passion, have led global conservation efforts and have achieved high recognition in their field of study.

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Saving Chimps From Snares (Graphic Images)!

This is the story of Mugu Moja, a young juvenile chimpanzee.