Africa Programs

How Can We Save Them?

How can we even try to save the chimpanzees and forests if the people are so obviously struggling to survive? - Dr. Goodall.

Learn about JGI's efforts to protect wild chimpanzees through

Republic of Guinea

JGI began implementing integrated conservation and development activities in Guinea in 2005 with a significant education and awareness-raising campaign focused on chimpanzees and environmental conservation.

Programs Image: 

Tanzania Conservation Action Plan

Developing a comprehensive action plan focused on guaranteeing the long-term survival of chimpanzees in Tanzania.
Key Staff Members: 

Threats to chimpanzees in Tanzania include unsustainable agriculture, fuel wood extraction, logging, expansion of human settlements, disease and a growing problem of hunting for bushmeat and witchcraft.

Key Activities:

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Great Ape Conservation Fund will help JGI and partners develop strategies designed to abate the most critical threats to chimpanzees and their habitats. These will include strategies to:

Tanzania REDD program

Demonstrating how traditional rural communities can lead -- and benefit from -- forest management initiatives that incorporate tracking of carbon data and the sale of earned carbon credits
Key Staff Members: 

Background / Issues:

The project, which involves a variety of leading public and private partners, received a three-year, $2.7 million (USD) grant from the Royal Norwegian Embassy in Tanzania.
 

Republic of the Congo

Congo is one of the most densly forested countries in Africa.  There are estimated to be around 10,000 chimpanzees in the Republic of Congo.  Great apes in the country are threatened by human conflict, logging, the spread of disease, and hunting for the commercial, illegal bushmeat trade. 

Programs Image: 

Democratic Republic of the Congo

As part of the Congo Basin, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) contains the world's second largest rainforest.  There are estimated to be roughly 70,000 to 100,000 chimpanzees in the DRC.  Threats to the great apes in the country include hunting for the illegal, commercial bushmeat trade, mining, deforestation and civil strife.  In response to these threats, the Jane Goodall Institute (JGI) is leading a conservation action plan (CAP) in the eastern DRC.  The CAP will target more than 66 million acres, which contain approximately 15,000 chimpanzees and somewhe

Programs Image: 

Africa Programs

Since the early 1990s, the Jane Goodall Institute (JGI) has recognized that protecting the environment and species can no longer remain separate from the task of improving the human condition.  Rapidly increasing destruction of forests and the pressures of growing populations mean that reaching individual farmers and villagers is key to conservation success.  That’s why, in African chimpanzee range countries, JGI works to build the capacity of rural communities to be self-sustaining in ways that enable them to prosper economically and

Programs Image: 

Uganda

In Uganda, the Jane Goodall Institute (JGI)  increases the capacity of local ecoguards and government employees to manage protected areas; engages local communities in land-use and natural resource-use planning; promotes sustainable livelihoods; and educates students about wildlife and the importance of healthy ecosystems.

Programs Image: 

Tanzania

The Jane Goodall Institute (JGI) works in western Tanzania to reduce human population pressures and protect chimpanzees and their forest habitat.  In 1994, JGI's community-centered conservation approach was developed through the implementation of the Lake Tanganyika Catchment, Reforestation and Education (TACARE) program in the area in and around Gombe National Park.  Since then, the TACARE model has been expanded from Gombe National Park to larger and more pristine chimpanzee habitat to the south.

Programs Image: 

Fansi Anaumwa! (Fansi is Sick!)

In his latest blog entry, Dr. Deus Mjungu, Gombe Stream Research Center’s director of chimpanzee research, discusses a recent illness at Gombe National Park, Tanzania.

Fansi Anaumwa! (Fansi is Sick!)

For an animal, getting sick is a simple fact of life. Despite this, it’s particularly concerning when a chimpanzee falls ill. At Gombe, disease is one of the main causes of death for chimpanzees. Therefore, we keep a particularly vigilant eye on the chimps in the park.

Syndicate content
 

JGI News and Highlights

Featured Video

Super Kodo Enviro Kid's Videos

Check out this video about JGI's latest crowd funding effort for seven new episodes of its popular environmental education series for kids.

Featured Video

Featured Video

Saving Chimps From Snares (Graphic Images)!

This is the story of Mugu Moja, a young juvenile chimpanzee.