Chimpanzees

Communication

Chimpanzees communicate in many ways, most notably through sounds and calls, but also through touch, facial expressions and body language.

Chimpanzees communicate in many ways, most notably through sounds and calls. They also communicate with each other through touch, facial expressions and body language.

 

Biology & Habitat

Chimpanzees, one of our closest living relatives, can be found in 21 countries in equatorial Africa.

  • Biologically, chimpanzees are more closely related to humans than they are to another species of great apes—gorillas. In fact, humans and chimpanzees share about 95 percent to 98 percent of the same DNA.
     
  • Chimpanzees can catch and be infected with human diseases. Read more on this topic.
     
  • In the wild, chimpanzees seldom live past age 50. Some captive individuals, however, have lived past the age of 60.

Tool Use, Hunting & Other Discoveries

Learn about some of the groundbreaking discoveries made at Gombe National Park in the past 50+ years!

In 1960,  Jane Goodall traveled to what was then Gombe Stream Chimpanzee Reserve in the British protectorate of Tanganyika to study the behavior of the wild chimpanzees. The groundbreaking discoveries she made in Gombe became the foundation of future chimpanzee behavioral research and dramatically changed how animal behavior is studied.

Tool Making & Tool Use
Hunting
Family Relationships

Fansi Anaumwa! (Fansi is Sick!)

In his latest blog entry, Dr. Deus Mjungu, Gombe Stream Research Center’s director of chimpanzee research, discusses a recent illness at Gombe National Park, Tanzania.

Fansi Anaumwa! (Fansi is Sick!)

For an animal, getting sick is a simple fact of life. Despite this, it’s particularly concerning when a chimpanzee falls ill. At Gombe, disease is one of the main causes of death for chimpanzees. Therefore, we keep a particularly vigilant eye on the chimps in the park.

Jane Goodall's Favorites

Featured Video

Saving Chimps From Snares (Graphic Images)!

This is the story of Mugu Moja, a young juvenile chimpanzee.

 

And Now, A Baby for Golden!

In his latest blog entry, Dr. Deus Mjungu, Gombe Stream Research Center’s director of chimpanzee research, discusses the newest addition to the G family in Gombe National Park, Tanzania.

It’s been two days since we saw Golden with her new baby for the first time. One month and four days after her identical twin sister had a baby, Golden has also given birth.

The Baby Swap

In his latest blog entry, Dr. Deus Mjungu, Gombe Stream Research Center’s director of chimpanzee research, discusses a recent chimpanzee baby exchange at Gombe National Park, Tanzania.

It has been 12 days now since Glitter became a mom for the first time. However, for the past few days, Gremlin, Glitter’s mother, has been carrying, nursing, and otherwise providing all the necessary physical protection for Glitter’s new baby.

Catching Up With Old Friends

Edgar (left) and Forest (right)

A New Perspective on Chimpanzees!

"For the past 10 days, we have taken a different angle on filming chimps. Rather than shooting a fig-eating sequence in the traditional way—from the ground looking up 100 feet or so to the treetops—we decided to move up to the chimps' level. 

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JGI News and Highlights

Featured Video

Walk in the footsteps of Jane Goodall with Google Maps

Featured Video

Featured Video

Saving Chimps From Snares (Graphic Images)!

This is the story of Mugu Moja, a young juvenile chimpanzee.