Chimpanzees

Meet Kudia

Kudia was one of the first Tchimpounga chimpanzees to be transferred to Tchindzoulou Island.  She received this special honor because of her independent and courageous nature, as well as her excellent health.

Kudia

Tchimpounga Begin Process to Release Mandrills

Thanks to generous donations, staff members at the Jane Goodall Institute’s Tchimpounga sanctuary are set to begin the process of releasing eight rehabilitated mandrills back into the wild. In the weeks to come, these eight mandrills will be able to call the Conkouati–Douli National Forest in the Republic of Congo home.

 

Team JGI at the G.R.A.S.P. 2nd Council Meeting in Paris

From left to right: Jeroen Haijtink (France), Fede Bogdanowicz (Spain), Lilian Pintea (USA), Diederik Visser (Netherlands) and Mary Humphrey (USA).

 

First Group of Chimpanzees Released on Tchindzoulou Island

It’s been 20 years since the Tchimpounga Chimpanzee Rehabilitation Center (TCRC) opened in the Republic of Congo.  Dr. Jane Goodall founded the sanctuary to provide care and hope to the chimpanzee victims of the illegal commercial bushmeat and pet trades.  Today, many of the chimpanzee residents are adults who need to explore and expand their horizons beyond the boundaries of the existing facility.  Recognizing this need, the Jane Goodall Institute (JGI) put a great deal of effort into creating a more natural environment for the Tchimpounga chimpanzees.

JGI team bring the box with Kudia to the island

Meet Motambo: Tchimpounga's Newest Arrival (Graphic Images)

 

Note: This video includes graphic images.

Meet Motambo, the newest arrival at the Jane Goodall Institute's Tchimpounga Chimpanzee Rehabilitation Center in the Republic of Congo. When Motambo first arrived, it was clear from his symptoms that he had a severe case of tetanus, most likely from a laceration on his arm from a wire snare. With close medical attention and care from JGI's staff at Tchimpounga, Motambo is on the mend and healing.

Meet Moboulou

Chimpanzees like Moboulou demonstrate many human-like behaviors.  Like us, rules govern chimpanzee societies and there are standards that all individuals must respect and adhere to in order to maintain harmony and stability in the community.  The first rule is that there is a single alpha male in each community who must be obeyed.  Moboulou represents this social figure in his community and he plays the part very well.  Moboulou is not overly violent or authoritarian.  Instead, he uses his strong character and diplomacy to mitigate and resolve conflicts.

Moboulou

JGI Welcomes New Baby at Gombe National Park

On the morning of October 8, 2012, Gombe field assistants saw Tanga with a new baby.  They tried to alert others researchers in the field who were closer to Tanga, but before any of them could get a good look at the newborn, Sparrow tried to take Tanga’s infant with help from Sheldon, Sparrow’s son.  Tanga screamed and Faustino ran to help her, displaying in such a fashion that Sparrow and Sheldon scattered.

Syndicate content
 

JGI News and Highlights

Featured Video

From the Ground to the Cloud: Transforming Chimpanzee Conservation with High-Tech Tools

 

Featured Video

Featured Video

Saving Chimps From Snares (Graphic Images)!

This is the story of Mugu Moja, a young juvenile chimpanzee.