Tanzania

Dr. Goodall: Today is a Day for Elephants

World Elephant Day, August 12, is one when animal lovers around the world join together to celebrate the miracle that is the Elephant.  It is a day to contemplate how truly wonderful they are, with their complex social lives, the close affectionate and  supportive bonds between family members that can last through life. There is a long childhood when calves learn from their mothers and the wise elders. They are curious and playful.

Brothers & Sisters: Gombe's Siblings

                     
 
Just like human children, chimpanzee siblings will play, squabble and compete for the attention of their mother. Often, the bond between siblings will last for years.

For Immediate Release: BRINGCOM PARTNERS WITH THE JANE GOODALL INSTITUTE TO IMPROVE CONNECTIVITY FOR FLAGSHIP SITES

WASHINGTON, D.C. (July 22, 2015) – Fifty-five years ago, when Jane Goodall arrived on the shores of Lake Tanganyika, her communications technology was limited to some notebooks and a supply of pens and pencils.  Today, the work Dr. Goodall started continues at Gombe Stream Research Center, providing data for countless studies and as well as critical information about habitat health and land use.

55 Years at Gombe: Q and A With Jane on Growth of Life's Work

In 1960, anthropologist Louis Leakey sent Jane Goodall, a 26 year old native of England with no college degree or scientific experience, to Africa with a mission: learn everything she could about wild chimpanzees. Leakey hoped that information on chimpanzees would shed light on human’s evolutionary past. But for Goodall, studying the chimpanzees just to learn more about them was reward enough.

55 Years at Gombe: Q and A With Jane on Origins of Life Work

In 1960, anthropologist Louis Leakey sent Jane Goodall, a 26 year old native of England with no college degree or scientific experience, to Africa with a mission: learn everything she could about wild chimpanzees. Leakey hoped that information on chimpanzees would shed light on human’s evolutionary past. But for Goodall, studying the chimpanzees just to learn more about them was reward enough.

For Immediate Release: JANE GOODALL’S LONG TERM WILD CHIMPANZEE STUDY MARKS 55TH ANNIVERSARY

Research continues over five decades after famous primatologist first arrived in what is now Gombe National Park.

 

The Famous Chimps of Gombe

Written By: Elodie Freymann
 
Over the course of her life, Dr. Jane Goodall has observed and recorded the habits of many of the wild chimpanzees living in Gombe National Park. When Jane first arrived in 1960, little was known about the complexities of primate behavior. Though Jane made many remarkable discoveries during her first few years in the field, one of her most ground-breaking realizations was that chimpanzees experience emotions previously believed to be uniquely human. Through years of patient observation and thorough research, Dr.

Recent Science Roundup

After over 50 years of studying wild chimpanzees at Gombe National Park, Tanzania, as well as 20 years worth of research at JGI's Tchimpounga Chimpanzee Rehabilitation Center in the Congo, scientists continue to discover new and exciting facts about our closest living relatives. In this recent science roundup, we share some of the more exciting discoveries from the past few months.

 

 

JGI and Partners Move to the Next Stage to Develop an Unprecedented Chimpanzee Habitat Monitoring System

In 2012, JGI set the ambitious 30-year goal of protecting with partners chimpanzees in countries that currently cover 85 percent of chimpanzees and their habitats in Africa. One of chimpanzees’ greatest threats is the loss of their habitat. As human populations expand, so too do their need for resources, which in turn threatens forests and woodlands where chimpanzees live.
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Walk in the footsteps of Jane Goodall with Google Maps

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Saving Chimps From Snares (Graphic Images)!

This is the story of Mugu Moja, a young juvenile chimpanzee.