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FAQs with Jane: What were your parents’ names?

Dr. Jane’s father’s name was Mortimer Herbert and her mother’s name was Margaret Myfanwe, but everyone called her Vanne.

FAQs with Jane: Do you have any siblings?

Dr. Jane has one sister named Judy who lives at their childhood home called, “The Birches.” Judy has two daughters and two grandsons. Between lecture tours, Dr. Jane returns to The Birches and enjoys spending time with her family and the company of the dogs who call The Birches home.

FAQs with Jane: Where did you grow up?

Dr. Jane grew up in Bournemouth, England. She moved from France to her grandmother’s house, The Birches, in Bournemouth when World War II began. Today, when Dr. Goodall is not on tour, she returns to The Birches where her sister Judy lives with her family.
 
For more information about Dr. Jane’s early life, please visit janegoodall.org/study-corner.

FAQs with Jane: Where were you born?

Dr. Jane was born in London, England, on April 3, 1934.

FAQs with Jane: What is the story behind the plush toy monkey you’re holding?

In this video, Dr. Jane talks about her mascot: a plush toy monkey named Mr. H. Over the years, Dr. Jane and Mr. H have visited more than 50 countries, and he has been shared with millions of people, including countless children! Dr. Jane tells the story behind Mr. H and the origin of his unusual name.
If you would like your own Mr. H Jr. plush toy — that looks just like the original Mr. H — please visit janegoodall.org/product/mr-h-jr.

FAQs with Jane: What can we do every day to make a difference for people, animals and the environment?

Dr. Jane says that the most important thing that each and every one of us can do everyday is to think about the consequences of the choices that we make, and how those decisions can impact other people, animals and the environment.. In this video, Dr. Jane discusses some specific decisions we should consider.

FAQs with Jane: What can kids do to make a difference?

Dr. Jane hopes that young people all over the world will join Jane Goodall’s Roots & Shoots, the Jane Goodall Institute’s global environmental and humanitarian youth program. Today, there are hundreds of thousands of Roots & Shoots members in more than 130 countries working to improve the world for people, animals and the environment. If you are interested in learning more about Roots & Shoots and how you can get involved, please visit rootsandshoots.org.

Join Jane for the JGI's Annual Sandhill Crane Migration Trip

In her 2009 book Hope for Animals and Their World, Dr. Jane Goodall looks at species that have been brought back from the brink of extinction, including Nebraska’s famous sandhill cranes.

Youth Council Launches New US National Parks Initiative

Initiative includes video contest for grants to support projects that protect wildlife and wild places.
 
This week, the National Youth Leadership Council (NYLC) of Jane Goodall’s Roots & Shoots, JGI’s global environmental and humanitarian youth program, launched a new US-based initiative seeking to protect the country’s network of national parks.

Tchimpounga Receives Support from JGI Offices in Europe

Recently, several European offices of the Jane Goodall Institute (JGI) including the Austria, Belgium, Germany, Hungary, Netherlands and Switzerland worked collaboratively to support JGI’s Tchimpounga Chimpanzee Rehabilitation Center in the Republic of Congo through each of their Chimpanzee Guardian Programs. After securing three islands in the Kouilou River for the next phase of our sanctuary build out, the staff at Tchimpounga have been working tirelessly to advance expansion efforts while still maintaining day to day operations.
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