ANZAC

Adorable Anzac

Little Anzac, a recent arrival at Tchimpounga, is one of the many victims of the illegal commercial bushmeat trade.  Congolese authorities confiscated her from a poacher before turning her over to the caregivers at the Jane Goodall Institute’s sanctuary.

In the mornings, Anzac loves to make grass angels, similar to the snow angels many human children make during the winter months.  She lies on her back, flapping her arms about and enjoying the feel of the dew-covered ground.

Tchimpounga Nursery Overflowing

Over the past six months, Tchimpounga has received six more orphaned infants.  As a result, each caregiver is taking care of three or more chimpanzees, which is overwhelming to say the least.

Lemba, a young chimpanzee whose legs are paralyzed from polio, acts as the adoptive mother.  Unlike the caregivers who have 24-hour responsibilities, Lemba’s duties only require that she play with the babies and keep an eye on them during the day. 

A New Arrival at Tchimpounga

At the end of April, Tchimpounga staff members welcomed a new arrival:  a baby girl named Anzac.  She was named Anzac because she came to the sanctuary on ANZAC Day (April 25, 2012)*, and because, like many war veterans, she had lost an arm.

When she arrived, Anzac was so small that the vet team had to weigh her using a food scale.  She weighed a mere 2.7 kilograms, making her one of the smallest chimps to arrive at the sanctuary.

Anzac being weighed
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